Abraham Lincoln meets Oprah

The story I told yesterday about my friend who lost her dad got me wondering about the connection between grief and gratitude … which through the magic of following Google leads down warrens brought me to the work of Dan McAdams.

A psychologist by trade, McAdams has compiled a social history of the sorts of stories that Americans tell themselves. These reflect the deep–down optimism that, as far as I’m concerned, marks the American attitude to life more than any other quality.

According to Publishers Weekly, McAdams analyzed hundreds of American stories — the Horatio Alger success stories, the early, middle and latter-day self-help classics, the writing of Ben Franklin, Abe Lincoln and good old Oprah. He looked at confessions from the Puritans and he read the narratives of slaves. He checked out all the back copies he could find of People magazine.

And what he found was this — that Americans tell redemptive stories.

Stories of deliverance from suffering. And that these stories help us on multiple levels. In one piece of research patients healed faster if they had a redemptive story to tell themselves. The kind of people who say things like “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade” have a much higher chance of surviving than the rest of us.

The interesting thing is this — redemptive stories are not happy tales. They are not glossed over, upbeat, superficial approaches to dark times. The deeper the trouble, the harder the toil, the longer the suffering, the more power a redemptive story has in equipping us with the perseverance to make it through such hardship.

All we have to believe is that Good can come from Bad.

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3 Comments

Filed under Bibliotherapy, Books etc., Identity, Not in London, States of mind

3 responses to “Abraham Lincoln meets Oprah

  1. Catherine

    Really? *those* people are going to survive? Could they learn something new to say?

    • nathaliehourihan

      I chose that example because I have to say … never before had it crossed my mind that people who use that expression are streets ahead of the rest of us on life-smarts. Empty-brained re alternative expressions that mean the exact same thing? Any suggestions from Poland?

  2. Heidi Barry

    absolutely Nat, the optimists and pessimists are just wired differently….

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